Lamp

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Lamps or light bulbs refer to devices that use electric current to provide interior or exterior artificial lighting. This article is a comparison of the environmental impact of different types of lamps. It currently compares energy use, material use, and waste production from incandescent, halogen, compact fluorescent (CFL), and light emitting diode (LED) lamps.

Energy Use[edit]

Energy used in the use-phase to produce 20 million lumen-hours of light[1]
Lamp type Energy use (kWh)
Incandescent 4194
Halogen 3611
CFL 1050
LED (2011) 983
LED (2015) 453

Material Use[edit]

Lamps required to produce 20 million lumen-hours of light[1]
Lamp type Lamps required
Incandescent 22
Halogen 27
CFL 3
LED (2011) 1
LED (2015) 0.6

Waste[edit]

Hazardous and non-hazardous waste (20 million lumen-hours of light)[2]
Lamp type Non-hazardous waste (kg) Hazardous waste (kg)
Incandescent 35.95 0.0234
CFL 13.289 0.0077
LED (2012) 12.3668 0.0081
LED (2017) 7.4469 0.0037

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products - Part I: Review of the Life-Cycle Energy Consumption of Incandescent, Compact Fluorescent, and LED Lamps. U.S. Department of Energy, Aug. 2012. Web. 2 Jan. 2017. Archived
  2. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products - Part 2: LED Manufacturing and Performance. U.S. Department of Energy, May. 2012. Web. 2 Jan. 2017. Archived